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New Skills and More Services for Clients as Consultant is Appointed as Notary

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Gepp & Sons' Consultant Jonathan Nutt has recently been appointed a notary public by the Registrar of the Faculty Office of the Archbishop of Canterbury, Peter Beesley. Contrary to popular belief, not all solicitors are notaries as of right. In fact there are only about 900 notaries practising in the UK and until a few years ago the Office tended to be handed down from Senior to Junior Partner, or from father to son, with few newcomers being admitted. Nowadays, however, it is very much a case of "what" rather than "who" you know and Jonathan can certainly testify to this, having been required to undertake two years of arduous weekend study at the University of Cambridge alongside his full time job as a solicitor at Gepp & Sons. "It was gruelling, particularly since it had been over forty years since I had last taken exams", Jonathan says. "In addition to learning the ropes of notarial practice it was necessary for me to study how laws conflict between different nations and also Roman law, which is the basis of many continental legal systems". At his investiture Jonathan received a parchment scroll sealed on behalf of the Archbishop, who is nominally in charge of all notaries in the UK. The scroll is a work of calligraphic art and shows that his right to practice as a notary never expires. "Jonathan's new skill is an excellent addition to the firm" property partner Edward Worthy comments. "Notaries are in short supply as the demands of the training does put many solicitors off taking the exams, yet notaries are an indispensible part of the English legal system. Gepp & Sons are always encouraging every member of staff to achieve of their best and this is an excellent example of our ethos of providing an all-round service for our clients". The notary public is the third and least well-known branch of the English legal system. Legal documents which deal with transactions in foreign countries often require the services of a notary, who is the "ultimate witness" to the document's authenticity. Those who are purchasing or selling property abroad will need a notary's services, as will those who require a power of attorney which will be effective abroad. As Jonathan says, "Being a notary is a position of great responsibility, but it's one that I have worked hard to achieve and one that I intend to fulfil to the best of my ability".

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